Glass Movie Review: M Night Shyamalan Film is Too Contrived to be Taken Seriously

Despite suspense and tension built into this dramatic thriller, there is something seriously missing in M Night Shyamalan’s latest oeuvre ‘Glass’.

Glass
Director: M Night Shyamalan
Cast: James McAvoy, Bruce Willis, Samuel L Jackson, Sarah Paulson, Anya Taylor-Joy, Spencer Treat Clark, Charlaye Woodard

Despite suspense and tension built into this dramatic thriller, there is something seriously missing in M. Night Shyamalan’s latest oeuvre Glass, and that something is the power-of-convincing.

Only if you are a fan of Shyamalan’s work would you realise that this pop-culture-psychological drama Glass, is an unexpected sequel to his two films — the psychological-horror thriller Split and the glacial comic-book art film “Unbreakable”.

The narrative of this film is complex and layered, which could lead to a multifaceted philosophical reckoning or at least some sort of a fascinating ideological debate. But unfortunately, the film is presented in such a rushed and haphazard fashion, that it misfires from all angles, never gaining any cerebral tractions.

For those not initiated into Shyamalan’s universe, this film is named after the character Samuel L Jackson originated in Unbreakable — the brittle-boned Elijah Price, aka Mr Glass who contended that comic books were not disposable fantasies for adolescents but “an ancient way of passing on history”.

Now, years later he is confined to his wheelchair in a psychiatric hospital where he has been imprisoned and heavily sedated. But it is only near the mid-point that Mr. Glass makes his presence felt.

The narrative begins on the trajectory set in Split where Kevin (James McAvoy), a psychopath with multiple distinct personalities, collectively known as The Horde, is on a killing spree. One of his personalities that encourages him to kill, is The Beast.

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